When One Parent Needs Assisted Living, and One Needs Independent Living

No matter how similarly a senior couple might have lived their lives, they most often age differently and will develop different health needs. While one parent needs assisted living, one needs independent living. Or, one may need specialized memory care, while the other needs light assistance with daily tasks.

These varying needs often put couples and caregivers in a difficult position: Do we take care of Mom at home while Dad lives in a memory community? As a couple, do you live in an independent living community while your spouse lives in assisted living?

There’s good news: communities do exist that can handle multiple levels of care. While each person receives individualized treatments and specialized assistance, they both can still enjoy meals, activities, and familiar routines together.

Assisted living for couples: Weighing the options

As senior couples age, they most likely will develop varying health needs. Some people remain independent into the later years of life, while others require daily assistance and help with bathing, dressing, and using the bathroom.

If, for example, one parent needs more assistance from assisted living and one can manage independent living, it can put families in an uncomfortable position. Do you split up your parents? Should your spouse leave home to go to an assisted living community?

Fortunately, there are communities that understand these decisions are not fair to make, and families should be able to stay together as much as possible. You and your spouse have lived a full life together, and should be able to continue to enjoy each other’s company and familiar routines as you age.

How communities address different levels of care

If a senior couple requires independent or assisted living, communities can keep them in the same suite, or work to bring them as close as possible to allow for more quality time together. 

It might seem impossible for Mom and Dad to be able to age in place while one’s memory loss is advancing. But in communities with memory care, assisted living, and independent living, such as Kensington Park, they can still enjoy community activities, life enrichment, and dining.

Despite how active one parent remains while the other needs care, Kensington Park can keep couples together. A community that offers all levels of assistance, from the most independent living to advanced memory or other care, is working to keep families together.

How a community can support senior couples

Establishing a care plan for aging parents as early as possible will help families be financially and mentally prepared when one or both require additional assistance. It also gives senior couples a say in where and how they live before their care becomes urgent.

The care plan should include everything from potential caregiving and home health aides to financial and legal plans. It also should include an independent and assisted living community that is capable of providing all levels of care.

Discuss with your parents the benefits of moving into a community even when their health needs are light. A community will free up their time and keep them safe by handling all the chores and household maintenance.

No more yard work and housekeeping 

As we age, our normal household duties can quickly become overwhelming. Activities such as raking the leaves or painting the house are exhausting tasks. Especially if one parent ends up taking on a caregiver role for the other, household maintenance will easily become too much for one person who is caring for another.

In a community with independent and assisted living, senior couples can enjoy the benefits of a simple life, free of chores but rich in activities.

Safety in any scenario

Those household chores and maintenance aren’t just a nuisance, they can become dangerous. If a spouse already is a caregiver for their partner and slips on the ice while shoveling, they now both need immediate care.

Dangerous situations can be avoided in a safe community where each person is receiving the appropriate amount of care. Medical professionals are available every day, 24 hours a day, for any and all health needs that arise — even for a rapid change of needs.

Kensington Park provides multiple levels of expert care

If you’re concerned your senior parents won’t be able to reside together in a community setting, or you won’t be able to age in place with your spouse, Kensington Park is here to assure you that we do everything we can to keep couples together.

We understand the challenges of moving to a community when one parent needs assisted living and one needs independent living. However, a community often is the best, safest option for keeping families close no matter the required level of care.

Independent living, assisted living, and memory care

Kensington Park offers luxurious independent living, assisted living, and memory care in our community. This means we are equipped to handle whichever level of care you or your spouse require — and we can do it while helping you maintain the same familiar, comfortable routines you both love.

Life enrichment and fine dining

Our community excels in wellness services, life enrichment activities, and fine dining experiences, all in a cozy, loving environment. We not only want you to keep your routines and all the things you loved about home, but we enthusiastically encourage you to continue doing those things. 

Compassionate, loving care — through every phase of life

As your health needs change or advance, we will be right there to support you both through every challenge. Our Promise is to love and care for your family as we do our own. When you move into Kensington Park, you are family.

Please reach out to us today to learn more about our community, our levels of care, and how we can best serve you and your family.

 

Further Reading:

To learn more about our exceptional assisted living and memory care at Kensington Park, click below or give us a call today for any questions. We promise to love and care for your family, as we do our own.

 

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