“Music is a language that doesn’t speak in particular words. It speaks in emotions, and if it’s in the bones, it’s in the bones.” ― Keith Richards

Melissa Pate

As we welcome the New Year, we are reminded of new beginnings and opportunities that a clean slate can bring. We are continuously expanding our creative arts therapies team and exploring the therapeutic benefits of pedagogy in older adults. It’s never too late to learn a new instrument or take vocal lessons, and maybe even have a solo in one of our many choirs here at Kensington Park. “Hanser (1985) states that one of the foundations of the use of music is its appeal to so many people, regardless of functioning level, age, or ability.” Music is a universal language that connects us all to each other, but it is also powerful in a way that it is able to connect us to ourselves. Recreating music of meaning, whether it be vocally and/or physically, can facilitate an increase in self-esteem, decrease depression, and overall understanding of personal well-being among many other beneficial goals. If you would like to learn more about this or other music programs, please contact music therapist, Melissa Pate, at mpate@kensingtonsl.com

Hays, T. & Minichiello, V. (2005). The meaning of music in the lives of older people: a qualitative study. Psychology of Music, Vol 33(4):437-451

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